The treatment team

Treatment and care of children with cancer is usually provided by a team of health professionals called a multidisciplinary team. Members of this team are specialists in children’s cancers – they understand the differences between children’s cancer and adult cancer, and each team member brings different skills in managing care to meet the needs of both you and your child.

The team will be led by a childhood cancer specialist (paediatric oncologist). Other members of the team depend on the age of your child and their type of disease, and may change over time as your child's needs change.

Members of the treatment team may include:

  • specialists in childhood cancer (paediatric oncologists)
  • surgeons who specialise in operating on children (paediatric surgeons)
  • specialists in diseases affecting the nervous system (neurologists)
  • specialists in using radiation to treat cancer (radiation oncologists)
  • specialists in medical imaging (radiologists)
  • specialists in hormones and body development (endocrinologists)
  • specialists in laboratory diagnosis (pathologists)
  • specialists in the eyes and vision (ophthalmologists)
  • specialists in blood disorders (haematologists)
  • specialists in medicines that produce loss of feeling (anaesthetists)
  • nurses who specialise in caring for children with cancer
  • doctors who specialise in caring for children (paediatricians)
  • dermatologists
  • plastic surgeons
  • dieticians
  • psychologists or psychiatrists
  • social workers
  • fertility counsellors
  • occupational therapists
  • physiotherapists
  • educational coordinators
  • genetic counsellors
  • dentists
  • pharmacists
  • your child’s general practitioner (GP).

published: Sunday, 23 August, 2015